Section

  • 1
  • 2

    OverviewModule 2 covers consequentialism. Module 1 introduces the general theory of consequentialism and the conception of the good.

    Learning Objectives

    After completing modules 1 and 2, you will be able to:

    • Discuss the role of theory in ethics.
    • Recognize the utilitarian or consequentialist framework in ethical, economic, or health policy arguments.
    • Identify the strengths and weaknesses of consequentialist arguments.
    • Examine different theorists' conceptions of the good.
  • 3

    OverviewModule 3 continues the topic of consequentialism, exploring the differences between rule and act utilitarianism and the challenges of utilitarianism.

    Learning Objectives

    After completing modules 1 and 2, you will be able to:

    • Discuss the role of theory in ethics.
    • Recognize the utilitarian or consequentialist framework in ethical, economic, or health policy arguments.
    • Identify the strengths and weaknesses of consequentialist arguments.
    • Examine different theorists' conceptions of the good.
  • 4

    OverviewModule 4 introduces deontology and explains the differences between deontology and utilitarianism.

    Learning Objectives

    After completing modules 3 and 4, you will be able to:

    • Explain why deontology is the standard alternative to utilitarianism
    • Recognize the deontological framework in some ethical arguments and in critiques of health policy argument
    • Identify the strengths & weaknesses of deontological arguments
    • Apply deontology to standard issues in medical ethics — e.g., autonomy
  • 5

    OverviewModule 4 continues the examination of deontology and reviews the challenges to deontology.

    Learning Objectives

    After completing modules 3 and 4, you will be able to:

    • Explain why deontology is the standard alternative to utilitarianism
    • Recognize the deontological framework in some ethical arguments and in critiques of health policy argument
    • Identify the strengths & weaknesses of deontological arguments
    • Apply deontology to standard issues in medical ethics — e.g., autonomy
  • 6

    OverviewModules 5 covers paternalism. Paternalism is not an ethical viewpoint, per se, but an element of many policies.

    Learning Objectives

    After completing modules 5, you will be able to:

    • Recognize paternalism in a variety of public policies and practices
    • Discuss the arguments for and against paternalistic justifications
    • Examine paternalism in issues of medical ethics and research ethics — e.g., risk management
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9

    OverviewModule 8 introduces the topic of human rights.

    Learning Objectives

    After completing module 8, you will be able to:

    • Examine the alleged differences between human rights, moral rights, and legal rights
    • Discuss some controversies over what constitutes a human rights violation
    • Describe the “practice” of human rights
    • 10

      Overview

      Module 9 introduces the topic of virtue ethics.  

      Learning Objectives

      After completing module 9, you will be able to:

      • Examine the contrast between an ethics of character and an ethics of action
      • Identify virtues of health professionals
      • 11

        OverviewModule 10 introduces the ethics of care and feminist critiques of ethical theories.

        Learning Objectives

        After completing module 10, you will be able to:

        • Discuss the feminist critique of standard ethical theories
        • Examine the strengths and weakness of an ethics of care
        • 12